“African Development Bank celebrates milestone with first social bond listing on London Stock Exchange” – Africa News – April 3, 2020

On April 3, 2020 Africa News reported that the “African Development Bank’s “Fight Covid-19” social bond, the largest social bond to date to be issued in the capital markets, listed on London Stock Exchange on Friday 3 April 2020, and is now available through its Sustainable Bond Market.

The listing marks an important milestone as the Bank launches its first bond on London Stock Exchange.

The over-subscribed transaction, which attracted $4.6 billion of interest in the book and raised an exceptional $3 billion, was launched to alleviate the impact of Covid-19 on Africa’s economies and livelihoods.

The three-year maturity bond, garnered interest from central banks and official institutions, bank treasuries and asset managers including Environment, Social and Governance (ESG) investors.

Several high-quality ESG investors actively supported this remarkable transaction, including Affirmative Investment Management (UK), Breckinridge, Columbia Threadneedle (USA), the Government Pension Investment Fund, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, Pension Boards – United Church of Christ, PineBridge Investments, Praxis Impact Bond Fund, TIAA/Nuveen and the United Nations Development Program.

‘The international community must work together to successfully tackle the coronavirus pandemic. The UK, along with partners like the African Development Bank and London Stock Exchange Group, is supporting the most vulnerable countries to invest in their own health systems and avoid economic hardship,’ International Development Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan said about the listing.”

You may read the article on the Africa News internet site.

“In race for a sustainable alternative to plastic, Indonesia bets on seaweed” – Mongabay – March 25, 2020

On March 25, 2020 Mongabay reported that Indonesia, the world’s number two producer of seaweed, is experimenting with a number of bioplastic alternatives, including:  “edible cups made from seaweed, shopping bags from cassava starch and food containers from sugarcane fiber.”

You can read the article on the Mongabay internet site.